Sunday, November 29, 2020

Sports

Some Records Are Meant to be Played, Others Broken

1

Dave Dupre of Lyme recently caught this 4.5-pound lunker largemouth bass that proved instrumental in launching him into another career tournament win. Photo courtesy of Captain Morgan

Dave Dupre of Lyme recently caught this 4.5-pound lunker largemouth bass that proved instrumental in launching him into another career tournament win. (Photo courtesy of Captain Morgan )

2

Chris Brockett, who recently relocated to New York from Clinton, is vying for the New York state record for white catfish after the weight was certified by econ officer Brian Canzeri. Photo illustration courtesy of Captain Morgan

Chris Brockett, who recently relocated to New York from Clinton, is vying for the New York state record for white catfish after the weight was certified by econ officer Brian Canzeri. Photo (Illustration courtesy of Captain Morgan )

3

Young Vera Milone of Madison could very well be a future record breaker based on the success that she had fishing for snapper blues at West Wharf. Photo courtesy of Captain Morgan

Young Vera Milone of Madison could very well be a future record breaker based on the success that she had fishing for snapper blues at West Wharf. (Photo courtesy of Captain Morgan )

Fishing offers its fair share of rewards for anglers. Satisfaction, challenge, accomplishment, relaxation, recreation, quality time, food—and the list continues. During these times, there comes a point when need becomes a factor—a need to get out, a need to do something different, a need to become positive, and so forth. Fishing is an activity that can provide all of that and more.

Sometimes, the furthest thing from an angler’s mind is to hook, fight, and reel in a personal-best catch. Other times, though, the purpose is to do just that—catch a memorable winner. With every fish caught, there is a story. And if the one caught is a personal best, then all the better.

Take Leslie Slater of Barkhamsted, for instance. While fishing from her kayak on the West Branch Reservoir in Colebrook after having been without power due to the recent storm, Slater was simply looking to have a relaxing day with her family. Maybe a trout would take her lure or perhaps something else. What happened next was totally unexpected. After a huge hit, the thought of a snagged bottom quickly left and, in its place, was a hard-fighting fish that ultimately was caught and tied the state record for a northern pike—a 29-pound, 46-inch brute.

Chris Brockett, a former Clinton resident now living in New York, is a lifelong fisher who is always up for a challenge, whether fishing salt or freshwater. Recently, while fishing the Mohawk River specifically for catfish, Brockett baited up and was working a deep hole by a power plant outflow. The chunk of bait he was using was picked up, the hook was set, and the fight began. Soon, a 12-pound, 30.5-pound cat was caught and thereafter certified by an econ officer. Brockett was astute enough to believe that he had caught a white catfish and, if it is, it will go into the New York state record books as a new record, surpassing the old one by 1.5 pounds.

Dave Dupre of Lyme is no stranger to the largemouth bass circuit. He’s always looking to hook into lunker bass and win tournaments. That’s what serious largemouth bass fishers do and what Dupre is all about. Most recently, he battled challenging fishing conditions at Mansfield Hollow to come up with another tournament victory with the help of a 4.5-pound lunker. Competition, challenges, and accomplishment are Dupre’s game on the water, but he’s quite the conversationalist, too.

These are just a few of the individuals who realized different goals through fishing. In accomplishing those goals, they not only set an example, but also made their moments count for both themselves and others to enjoy. Not everyone will catch winning fish or one that comes with bragging rights. However, in the end, everyone will have a story to tell.

On the Water

A cold front swept in prior to the first day of the meteorological fall, coming on the heels of some unsettled weather that brought air temperatures down to the 50s before climbing back up into the 80s. This is a sure sign of the approaching season. Long Island Sound inshore water temps also took a dip by a couple of degrees and that was enough to perk up fishing. After the previous week of battering seas, the change was welcome.

For starters, the blackfish (tautog) season closed until Saturday, Oct. 10. However, the other fisheries are gaining steam. Atlantic menhaden is still schooling and appears to be getting a bit more attention from bluefish than during the recent tournament. Bluefish sizes remain smaller than in previous years and that is no surprise considering their recent history. However, snappers are being fished for and caught, even though the daily creel limit for bluefish is three.

We are seeing keeper black sea bass feeding closer to shore and more fluke in the 20- to 24-inch range taking squid, despite the fact that shorts are still more plentiful. Although summer flounder (fluke) are being caught within earshot of land, larger fish are still preferring the deep. The porgy (scup) bite continues to be good throughout much of the Sound, as are the skate, ray, sand shark, sea robin, and northern kingfish bites.

We are looking forward to albie and bonito runs that develop closer to shore, but all of that hinges on the rain bait. Meanwhile, early fall striped bass action is expected to improve as more bait flee the estuaries and schools of baitfish ball up near shore. Live eels are currently generating catches, along with plugs, worms, and chunks. Effectively working a bucktail jig with an added strip for an attention-getter is always a good choice. Look for the reefs and rips to light up if we get some of those Block Island and Montauk fish detouring into the Sound.

Temperature drops coupled with better levels and flows have improved trout river fishing, but it’s still challenging. Lake and pond fishing is doing a bit better in deeper parts when trolling. Other species such as largemouth and smallmouth bass are doing quite well with soft plastics, spinnerbaits, cranks, and jigs. Catfish, pickerel, perch, black crappie, and sunfish are biting on worms and artificials.

Note: Email us pics of your catches to share with our USA and international fishing friends who keep up with the latest fishing news and frequent social media.

For all things fishy including rod repairs, swing by the shop (203-245-8665) open seven days located at 21 Boston Post Road, Madison. Until next time from your Connecticut shoreline’s full-service fishing outfitter, where we don’t make the fisherman, we make the fisherman better...

Tight Lines,

Captain Morgan

captainmorganusa@hotmail.com

captainmorgan-fish.blogspot.com

twitter @captmorgan_usa



Reader Comments